The Melanie Klein approach to confusing Green issues.

Naomi Klein – talented writer who misses her targets

Published by the Rising Brook Writers Workshop 28th October 2016

Naomi Klein’s 2014 book THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING has an obscure title masking an urgent message. With a film of the book on the way, most green sympathisers will know that the ambiguous THIS in the title refers to climate change. Her argument is that the trend to global warming could destroy us all. A clear message on how it could be combated would be welcome. But the way she puts her views make them as obscure as the title.

The first problem is that the book relies on detailed factual narrative to explain its case. As the first part of the book makes the case that global warming is changing everything, she gives page after page of detailed description of negative developments. Fair enough, but very heavy reading and overwhelmingly bad news. At least one of the readers in my discussion group said they had given up in depression. The chair said “but it does get better towards the end”. Fat lot of use if people have stopped reading.

The approach all the way through the book is heavy fact laden exposition, as if facts change minds. I am a follower of Thomas A Kuhn, who argued that if a paradigm is heavily entrenched then it can resist a bombardment of facts, and the Green case supports the argument. The capitalist paradigm is very heavily entrenched and has become more successful in resisting challenges to it over the last half century. The facts are important but need to be carefully targetted. In this case, on the floating voter.

Most green supporters agree with Klein and will read this to reinforce their views. The climate deniers won’t accept the case whatever the facts. So if Klein and her sympathisers are to make advances, it is the undecided that have to be won over. Klein knows that there is something wrong. Worryingly as the factual case has grown stronger support for the Green solutions in the English speaking nations has declined. She says so on page 35, quoting the statistic that in 2007 71% of Americans believed burning fossil fuels was damaging the environment. By 2009 this was 51% and in 2011 down to 44%. The facts had been made clearer over that four year period, yet belief in them went down.

The same trend happened in Britain and Australia. Facts are not decisive, and if a paradigm shift is to happen then winning hearts and minds is essential. This book is aimed at winning over the unconvinced, but Klein has adopted relentless bombardment of facts, like a First World War general bombarding the opposition trenches. The facts she quotes on page 35 should have made her put away her massive filo fax and think how to present a clear and persuasive argument.

A much shorter book would help. This was a very hard book to stay awake while reading. Sadly, having pointed out that the Americans had not been convinced by the green argument between 2007 and 2011, she did not digest that crucial information and the logic that to convince the unconvince, it is best not to preach and to try to persuade.

Trevor Fisher 18 10 16

Naomi Klein – talented writer who misses her targets

Published by the Rising Brook Writers Workshop 28th October 2016

Naomi Klein’s 2014 book THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING has an obscure title masking an urgent message. With a film of the book on the way, most green sympathisers will know that the ambiguous THIS in the title refers to climate change. Her argument is that the trend to global warming could destroy us all. A clear message on how it could be combated would be welcome. But the way she puts her views make them as obscure as the title.

The first problem is that the book relies on detailed factual narrative to explain its case. As the first part of the book makes the case that global warming is changing everything, she gives page after page of detailed description of negative developments. Fair enough, but very heavy reading and overwhelmingly bad news. At least one of the readers in my discussion group said they had given up in depression. The chair said “but it does get better towards the end”. Fat lot of use if people have stopped reading.

The approach all the way through the book is heavy fact laden exposition, as if facts change minds. I am a follower of Thomas A Kuhn, who argued that if a paradigm is heavily entrenched then it can resist a bombardment of facts, and the Green case supports the argument. The capitalist paradigm is very heavily entrenched and has become more successful in resisting challenges to it over the last half century. The facts are important but need to be carefully targetted. In this case, on the floating voter.

Most green supporters agree with Klein and will read this to reinforce their views. The climate deniers won’t accept the case whatever the facts. So if Klein and her sympathisers are to make advances, it is the undecided that have to be won over. Klein knows that there is something wrong. Worryingly as the factual case has grown stronger support for the Green solutions in the English speaking nations has declined. She says so on page 35, quoting the statistic that in 2007 71% of Americans believed burning fossil fuels was damaging the environment. By 2009 this was 51% and in 2011 down to 44%. The facts had been made clearer over that four year period, yet belief in them went down.

The same trend happened in Britain and Australia. Facts are not decisive, and if a paradigm shift is to happen then winning hearts and minds is essential. This book is aimed at winning over the unconvinced, but Klein has adopted relentless bombardment of facts, like a First World War general bombarding the opposition trenches. The facts she quotes on page 35 should have made her put away her massive filo fax and think how to present a clear and persuasive argument.

A much shorter book would help. This was a very hard book to stay awake while reading. Sadly, having pointed out that the Americans had not been convinced by the green argument between 2007 and 2011, she did not digest that crucial information and the logic that to convince the unconvince, it is best not to preach and to try to persuade.

Trevor Fisher 18 10 16

Naomi Klein – talented writer who misses her targets

Published by the Rising Brook Writers Workshop 28th October 2016

Naomi Klein’s 2014 book THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING has an obscure title masking an urgent message. With a film of the book on the way, most green sympathisers will know that the ambiguous THIS in the title refers to climate change. Her argument is that the trend to global warming could destroy us all. A clear message on how it could be combated would be welcome. But the way she puts her views make them as obscure as the title.

The first problem is that the book relies on detailed factual narrative to explain its case. As the first part of the book makes the case that global warming is changing everything, she gives page after page of detailed description of negative developments. Fair enough, but very heavy reading and overwhelmingly bad news. At least one of the readers in my discussion group said they had given up in depression. The chair said “but it does get better towards the end”. Fat lot of use if people have stopped reading.

The approach all the way through the book is heavy fact laden exposition, as if facts change minds. I am a follower of Thomas A Kuhn, who argued that if a paradigm is heavily entrenched then it can resist a bombardment of facts, and the Green case supports the argument. The capitalist paradigm is very heavily entrenched and has become more successful in resisting challenges to it over the last half century. The facts are important but need to be carefully targetted. In this case, on the floating voter.

Most green supporters agree with Klein and will read this to reinforce their views. The climate deniers won’t accept the case whatever the facts. So if Klein and her sympathisers are to make advances, it is the undecided that have to be won over. Klein knows that there is something wrong. Worryingly as the factual case has grown stronger support for the Green solutions in the English speaking nations has declined. She says so on page 35, quoting the statistic that in 2007 71% of Americans believed burning fossil fuels was damaging the environment. By 2009 this was 51% and in 2011 down to 44%. The facts had been made clearer over that four year period, yet belief in them went down.

The same trend happened in Britain and Australia. Facts are not decisive, and if a paradigm shift is to happen then winning hearts and minds is essential. This book is aimed at winning over the unconvinced, but Klein has adopted relentless bombardment of facts, like a First World War general bombarding the opposition trenches. The facts she quotes on page 35 should have made her put away her massive filo fax and think how to present a clear and persuasive argument.

A much shorter book would help. This was a very hard book to stay awake while reading. Sadly, having pointed out that the Americans had not been convinced by the green argument between 2007 and 2011, she did not digest that crucial information and the logic that to convince the unconvince, it is best not to preach and to try to persuade.

Trevor Fisher 18 10 16

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